Torque wrench question - GL1800Riders
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post #1 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 07:53 AM Thread Starter
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Torque wrench question

I am preparing to check swingarm pivot bolt torque. Reviewing the shop manual Section 14 it states "when using the lock nut wrench, use a deflecting beam type torque wrench 20 inches long". Got me to wondering:

1. Why wouldn't ANY type torque wrench be ok for this procedure? Is it something to do with using the lock nut wrench?

2. Why 20" specified? i.e. wouldn't a SHORTER or LONGER wrench get the job done properly?

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post #2 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 08:48 AM
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Maybe they found that the 20" was the most accurate.
The beam type torque wrenches do not seem to go out of calibration as do clicker type,don't know about the digital ones..
Just my thoughts and opinion.

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post #3 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 08:56 AM
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Honda was probably worried that their dealership trained technician might be prone to grab a hulking wrench with a designed range far exceeding the target torque. Consider the technician will have a heavier wrench on hand due to the high spec at the right side that is too large for the lower reading. Most torque wrenches, even when in calibration, yield reliable results chiefly in the upper 60% to 90% of their range; or so I have been told. I am not sure of the 20" beam length spec, except that is about how long low middle range beam wrenches are, so again, it may be to keep that 17 year-old freckle faced kid from grabbing a wrench with a face reading "0 to 250" pound feet. The spec for the engine mount tension is even less and call for a tiny beam type wrench. I would follow the shop annual advice on this one. I have wondered if we can reliably adjust the preload on those bearings with the suspension spring and wheel/tire attached. Probably much better than riding wit loose or tight setting, we may never know as it would be a royal PIA to check just to see.


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post #4 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 11:24 AM
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I believe that torque wrenches are calibrated based on the length of the wrench and they also may recommend that you place your hand in the exact spot on the handle that they recommend, based on their calibration.

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post #5 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 01:01 PM
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post #6 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 01:17 PM
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Bit of truth in all of the above. Length of wrench does not matter - the scale imprinted on the wrench is based on the length of the wrench. Whether you use a 6 inch or 6 foot, the scaling will be accurate for that wrench. Torque wrenches are calibrated from 20% to 100% of the full range value. They are traditionally more prone to being/staying accurate over the middle of the range. Beam types maintain accuracy longer, I've got one that is 50 years old that is still accurate (I used to calibrate torque wrenches). Clicker (impulse) styles are more prone to lose accuracy over time. On any click-style wrench, lower the torque setting to minimum when finished using it to maintain longevity and accuracy.


Most wrenches have a basic accuracy of 4% clockwise, 6% counter-clockwise. Use too big of a wrench, not enough resolution to see fine toque values and over-torque the fastener. Too small - too easy to exceed the torque range of the wrench.
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post #7 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 04:29 PM
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I think it's because the special tool that is used with the wrench does not place the end of the torque wrench over the centre of the nut as it would with a normal socket.

The special tool adds a few inches to the length of the torque wrench (torque arm length), so rather than working at 20", it is working at 22 or 23 (or whatever the 'special tool' adds)

Perhaps someone can post a picture from the manual that shows the wrench on the tools (someday I'll figure out how to copy pics from the manual; it's on page 15-27 of the electronic manual published in about 07 )

the accompanying torque spec says:

TORQUE: Actual: 108 Nm (11.0 kgfm, 80 lbfft)
Indicated: 98 Nm (10.0 kgfm, 72 lbfft)

The difference in the two ( 72 indicated vs 80 ft-lb actual) is due to the ratio of the length of the torque wrench to the length of the wrench+tool that is being used to apply the torque.

(again, a picture is worth a 1000 (or more) words -- if someone has the method to post the pic figured out)


EDIT: I don't think the important part is the beam, but rather that the wrench does not have a ratcheting head. Not having a ratcheting head ensures that the torque wrench stays directly in line with the 'special tool', so that the ratio of the indicated and actual does not change.
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Last edited by Farmguy; 01-05-2017 at 04:34 PM.
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post #8 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 07:28 PM
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post #9 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 08:07 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Farmguy View Post
I think it's because the special tool that is used with the wrench does not place the end of the torque wrench over the centre of the nut as it would with a normal socket.

The special tool adds a few inches to the length of the torque wrench (torque arm length), so rather than working at 20", it is working at 22 or 23 (or whatever the 'special tool' adds)

Perhaps someone can post a picture from the manual that shows the wrench on the tools (someday I'll figure out how to copy pics from the manual; it's on page 15-27 of the electronic manual published in about 07 )

the accompanying torque spec says:

TORQUE: Actual: 108 Nm (11.0 kgfm, 80 lbfft)
Indicated: 98 Nm (10.0 kgfm, 72 lbfft)

The difference in the two ( 72 indicated vs 80 ft-lb actual) is due to the ratio of the length of the torque wrench to the length of the wrench+tool that is being used to apply the torque.

(again, a picture is worth a 1000 (or more) words -- if someone has the method to post the pic figured out)


EDIT: I don't think the important part is the beam, but rather that the wrench does not have a ratcheting head. Not having a ratcheting head ensures that the torque wrench stays directly in line with the 'special tool', so that the ratio of the indicated and actual does not change.
Yup. Agree - I think you came up with the answer in your edit.
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Last edited by greyhound; 01-05-2017 at 08:09 PM.
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post #10 of 36 (permalink) Old 01-05-2017, 09:01 PM
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Waldo and Gator, thanks for the assist with the pic and the calcs sheet

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