oil drain plugs [Archive] - GL1800Riders

: oil drain plugs


goldwingrider.steve
03-27-2009, 04:42 AM
Just noticed the drain plugs for the engine oil and the final drive oil are the same size but the one for the final drive is magnetic. I'm thinking of getting another final drive drain plug and fitting it in place of the engine oil drain plug, surely it's better to have a magnetic plug there as well ??

Anyone else done this ?

LarryM
03-27-2009, 06:17 AM
Your final drive drain plug is magnetic? Mine is just a regular old bolt.

There are companies out there that would like you to believe there is a benefit to this, and of course they sell magnetic bolts. Some people think it is just the cat's meow.

goldwingrider.steve
03-27-2009, 06:38 AM
Yep, has a small magnet fitted in the tip of the bolt.

Justa_Poser
03-27-2009, 06:55 AM
All of the plugs (3) in my Harleys have magnets. They come that way from the factory.

None of my Japanese bikes came with them except the final drive drain bolt on the Wing.

Here's a link for a company that sells them for just about every motorcycle.

http://www.magneticdrainplug.com/motorcycle.html

LarryM
03-27-2009, 07:08 AM
Dang it, now you are going to make me change my oil just to see if I missed something! And it has only been in there for 30,000 miles.

Justa_Poser
03-27-2009, 07:15 AM
Dang it, now you are going to make me change my oil just to see if I missed something! And it has only been in there for 30,000 miles.

The magnet on the final drive drain bolt is recessed. I didn't notice it until the second time I changed it.

laen
03-27-2009, 08:39 AM
LarryM if your bottom final drive drain plug is stock it has a recessed magnet

SLOWDOG
03-27-2009, 03:38 PM
Would that affect the polarity of the crush washer?

Justa_Poser
03-27-2009, 04:23 PM
Would that affect the polarity of the crush washer?

It's OK, at least in the Northern Hemisphere anyway. :thumbup:

Jchefboyardee
03-27-2009, 05:56 PM
LarryM if your bottom final drive drain plug is stock it has a recessed magnet
+1

JMATANDEM
03-27-2009, 06:39 PM
Quote:Originally Posted by SLOWDOG Would that affect the polarity of the crush washer? It's OK, at least in the Northern Hemisphere anyway.
That is true only if you ride in a clockwise fashion. Riding counter-clockwise will wreak havoc with your crush washers, and require replacement between oil changes.

Larry Price
03-27-2009, 07:06 PM
If my bike is any example, I've had a magnetic drain plug on the engine for the last 50k miles. I have yet to find any thing attached to it. I thought I would at least see some metal particle wiskers, but none have been found. I wouldn't put having a magnetic drain plug on the engine real high on my priority list of modifications and maintenance. If it makes you feel good go for it. Don't worry about the crush washer, since your bike will now be magnetically balanced what ever effects that may occur will surely cancel each other. :lol:

GWNorman1800
03-27-2009, 08:30 PM
The final drive is more likely to have metal filings in the oil (large gear, small oil capacity) and that's why a magnet is fitted. Wouldn't do any harm to have one in the engine drain plug as well.

jcbrew
03-27-2009, 09:11 PM
Maybe it is simply because there is no oil filter in the final drive, but there is on the engine

LarryM
03-28-2009, 06:59 AM
Maybe it is simply because there is no oil filter in the final drive, but there is on the engine
Bingo!!!!! After thinking about this for a couple of days, I have come to realize that this magnet on the final drive bolt is probably not a bad idea.

But when deciding if this is equally beneficial to the crankcase, you have to look at the way these systems work. The gears in the final drive sit in a bath of oil. When those gears rotate, it swirls up any sediment that is sitting at the bottom. In the engine's crankcase, there is no such bath. Any metallic particles that become suspended in the oil settle to the bottom, where they stay there. Some of those filings will be there for the life of the engine. Any that do get picked up in the oil will either be blocked by the oil pump screen or embedded in the oil filter when it drains back to the crankcase.

Has anybody ever pulled the transmission pan on their car to do an oil change? The bottom of the pan is always full of metal particles, and some of them are a fairly decent size. They have been there since the transmission was new, when it was breaking in, and they are harmless. This is the tactic that sleezy transmission shops like AAMCO use as evidence to persuade unwary customers that their perfectly healthy transmission is coming apart, and needs to be replaced immediately.

Of course it won't hurt anything to use one for the engine, but I seriously doubt it would be of any benefit either. I know some people have these visions of abrasive metal particles floating in their engine oil, but it just isn't reality. We have an engine in our Goldwings with reliability that is the equal of any engine out there. It doesn't need your help in re-engineering it to get there. Change your oil at regular intervals, and get on the bike and just ride it.

laen
03-28-2009, 11:11 AM
Bingo!!!!! After thinking about this for a couple of days, I have come to realize that this magnet on the final drive bolt is probably not a bad idea.

But when deciding if this is equally beneficial to the crankcase, you have to look at the way these systems work. The gears in the final drive sit in a bath of oil. When those gears rotate, it swirls up any sediment that is sitting at the bottom. In the engine's crankcase, there is no such bath. Any metallic particles that become suspended in the oil settle to the bottom, where they stay there. Some of those filings will be there for the life of the engine. Any that do get picked up in the oil will either be blocked by the oil pump screen or embedded in the oil filter when it drains back to the crankcase.

Has anybody ever pulled the transmission pan on their car to do an oil change? The bottom of the pan is always full of metal particles, and some of them are a fairly decent size. They have been there since the transmission was new, when it was breaking in, and they are harmless. This is the tactic that sleezy transmission shops like AAMCO use as evidence to persuade unwary customers that their perfectly healthy transmission is coming apart, and needs to be replaced immediately.

Of course it won't hurt anything to use one for the engine, but I seriously doubt it would be of any benefit either. I know some people have these visions of abrasive metal particles floating in their engine oil, but it just isn't reality. We have an engine in our Goldwings with reliability that is the equal of any engine out there. It doesn't need your help in re-engineering it to get there. Change your oil at regular intervals, and get on the bike and just ride it.


+1

pidjones
03-28-2009, 11:48 AM
A magnet makes a good diagnostic, even if it may be a questionable preventative measure.

ww9l
03-28-2009, 12:30 PM
Kind of like chicken soup... couldn't hurt!

jbales
03-28-2009, 01:57 PM
In 2010 all HD parts will be magnetic so they will stay on the bike till you stop!:joke:

Riding High
03-28-2009, 02:55 PM
Maybe there's a plane drain plug because most of the innards are aluminum? :shrug: