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    Seasoned Member driver10's Avatar
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    Default refilling shock actuator

    Id like to know what type oil you use to refill actuator ,Im going to service it tomarrow if Im not recalled to work tonight.
    Thanks for advise

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    I have not had to work on that component yet but know some have used 5W Honda Suspension Fluid.
    Richard
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    According to Fred, the oil to use is the Honda brand ss7 5 weight suspension oil. I paid 6 bucks for the bottle.
    If you lock your dog and your wife in the trunk of your car, and then come back in four hours, only your dog will be glad to see you.

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    Seasoned Member ElBando's Avatar
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    I used Honda suspension fluid 10

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    Quote Originally Posted by driver10 View Post
    Id like to know what type oil you use to refill actuator ,Im going to service it tomarrow if Im not recalled to work tonight.
    Thanks for advise

    To refill the actuator.

    1) Place the bike on center stand.
    2) Start the bike and lower your presets to "0'.
    3) Remove the seat and side covers.
    4) Remove the rear fender.
    5) Remove the three bolts inside the right saddlebag.
    6) Remove the bolt on the outside upper right of the saddlebag to the frame.
    7) Now tilt out the bottom of the saddlebag and let it rest there-You do not have to disconnect anything further!
    8 ) Now remove the 2-12mm & 1-10mm bolts from the Actuator securing it to the frame.
    9) Now with a pair of needle nosed pliers-squeeze the push in cable holder for the Grey connector.
    10) Now you can remove the other connector from the Actuator.
    11) Now using brake clean,Spray the area at the banjo bolt/hose so it is clean-You'll be making marks on it there!.
    12) Now with a sharpie-make a dot on the top of the banjo "Fitting".So you'll know which end is up later on!.
    13) Now make a small line right under the dot you just made to the actuator body.What you are doing here is marking the Orientation of the banjo fitting to the actuator body!. Making Sure you put it back in the same place-this is Important so the hose doesn't get kinked when the actuator is bolted back on the frame later!!.
    14) Now you can remove the 10mm banjo bolt from the hose.
    15) Either with a helper or duct/masking tape-try and keep that end of the hose as high as you can so fluid doesn't drain out of it while you continue to the next step.(I run the tape up from the hose to the truck if working by myself!)This keeps the hose out of my way for the time being.
    16) Now with a thin screwdriver,Insert it into the banjo bolt hole in the actuator,and push the seal piston down with a little pressure until it bottoms out.If you feel or hear it move?.Then try to push it down again until it stays down!.You're trying to fill as much of the actuator reservoir as possible here!.
    17) Now you are ready to refill the actuator.it only takes a couple ounces to top it off.I use SS8-10wt oil.
    18 ) Once you have it topped off,Now replace the hose according to the marks you made earlier.
    19) Now before you bolt it back on-"Test it first"
    20) Plug both connectors back in the actuator,an start the bike.
    21) Listen for a "Sound" pitch change as you add presets.Once you hear it change sound-Let the button go,and look at the dash-If it's at "0" then you are done,If it at 1 or more.repeat the last steps to add a tad more fluid.

    Your goal is to hear a sound change at 0-1.

    Hope this helps.

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    Seasoned Member driver10's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone for the advise, Im heating up the garage now to start taking the Blue Ox apart and when the stealer finally opens up at 10 oclock Ill be there to see if I can get the oil.

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    Seasoned Member WingMan71's Avatar
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    I've heard some on this forum say they used hydraulic jack fluid.

    I plan on doing mine soon, and am wondering if it's OK to use that.

    ***
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    Quote Originally Posted by WingMan71 View Post
    I've heard some on this forum say they used hydraulic jack fluid.

    I plan on doing mine soon, and am wondering if it's OK to use that.

    ***
    As long as it's in the 5-10 wt oil range then yes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WingMan71 View Post
    I've heard some on this forum say they used hydraulic jack fluid.

    I plan on doing mine soon, and am wondering if it's OK to use that.

    ***
    That was the first thing that came to my mind too. Then I remembered that it is a shock too with dampening so the weight of the oil is important.

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    Seasoned Member WingMan71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoldWingrGreg View Post
    That was the first thing that came to my mind too. Then I remembered that it is a shock too with dampening so the weight of the oil is important.
    Greg, help me out here. That confuses me a bit.

    I thought that the actuator system that sets the preload on the spring is a completely separate hydraulic system from the actual shock absorber (damper unit) itself. I don't believe that any of the oil that is in the actuator system ever sees the inside of the actual shock absorber. It only mechanically sets the spring preload. The shock looks like a sealed damper unit just like a standard shock on a car, and it's damping rate never changes other than by wearing out of the internal components or a leak.

    Am I all wet here, or am I right about these two system being completely separate from each other in regards to the hydraulic fluid in each?

    ***
    Bob
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    Quote Originally Posted by WingMan71 View Post
    Greg, help me out here. That confuses me a bit.

    I thought that the actuator system that sets the preload on the spring is a completely separate hydraulic system from the actual shock absorber (damper unit) itself. I don't believe that any of the oil that is in the actuator system ever sees the inside of the actual shock absorber. It only mechanically sets the spring preload. The shock looks like a sealed damper unit just like a standard shock on a car, and it's damping rate never changes other than by wearing out of the internal components or a leak.

    Am I all wet here, or am I right about these two system being completely separate from each other in regards to the hydraulic fluid in each?

    ***
    You're right. Fluid only travels between the actuator via the hose to the Shock pre-loader! The shock is a sealed unit by itself.
    He's not!

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    Seasoned Member WingMan71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    Fluid only travels between the actuator via the hose to the Shock pre-loader! The shock is a sealed unit by itself.
    Rocky & Greg,

    Just checked the factory service manual to see what I could find out. It says the the shock absorber (damper unit) is a sealed unit filled with high-pressure nitrogen gas.

    That ain't gonna mix with oil!

    Thanks.

    ***
    Bob
    2006 Arctic White GL1800
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    1981 Blue/Blue CB650 Custom (Sold)
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    Seasoned Member driver10's Avatar
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    Well guys I just finshed the actuator refill, Put it back on bike and tried it before I buttom it up . Didnt hear it sounding like it was laboring so I took it apart again to see if it needed more, I topped it off again put it back to gather again and tried again same sound so I had my wife push button while took a flashlite and watched the top of the shock move. well it moved but didnt seem to move as much as freds did in his video. So it took the bike out for a ride on a street that had a drainage dip in it I started out on zero and added 5#s to it each time I went over the dips untill I got to #26 ,I couldnt tell an differance until it hit #16 Im I thinking this wrong or should I beable to tell a differance right away?

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    Quote Originally Posted by driver10 View Post
    Well guys I just finshed the actuator refill, Put it back on bike and tried it before I buttom it up . Didnt hear it sounding like it was laboring so I took it apart again to see if it needed more, I topped it off again put it back to gather again and tried again same sound so I had my wife push button while took a flashlite and watched the top of the shock move. well it moved but didnt seem to move as much as freds did in his video. So it took the bike out for a ride on a street that had a drainage dip in it I started out on zero and added 5#s to it each time I went over the dips untill I got to #26 ,I couldnt tell an differance until it hit #16 Im I thinking this wrong or should I beable to tell a differance right away?
    As I said above."You are listening for a sound pitch change from 0 on up".

    Bike on center stand,Bike running.set presets to 0-Then listed to the shock actuator for a sound change as you press the preset button."It Will Change Sound".When you hear it change sound-let the buttom go and read the readout on the display-That tells you where the actuator starts to labor pushing the fluid through the hose to the shock pre-loader on top of the shock to compress the spring.

    Anything above 1,it's still a tad low and can be topped off to start to labor (pushing the fluid) at 0-1.

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    Seasoned Member Larry Price's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    As long as it's in the 5-10 wt oil range then yes.
    It is.... and works just fine.... and it only 4 bucks at most auto parts stores....
    Gunk - Hydraulic Jack Oil

    Part Number: M33-12
    Line: GNK

    • mfg. defect warranty
    • UPC: 78698133300
    • Hydraulic Jack Oil
    • 12 Oz.





    Detailed Description

    Handles extreme pressure
    For use in all hydraulic jacks
    Mixes completely with other jack fluids
    SAE viscosity grade is 5W/10W
    Formulated with rust inhibitors and anti wear agents
    Larry Price
    Edgewood, WA

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    I just got done filling mine up and there is a couple of things I would add to Rocky's instructions.
    1. Run the preload motor down until it stops by itself meaning the plunger has bottomed out.
    2. You are dealing with a closed hydraulic system like your brakes so you need to bleed all the air out of the system. Disconnect the hose from the actuator and hold it up above the slave cylinder on the shock over night to let any air rise to the top of the hose.
    3. Then do as Fred H. shows on his maintenance CD's and loosen the 3 screws that hold the fluid reservoir to the actuator so you have about an 1/8 inch gap. Then with a thin screwdriver thru the banjo bolt hole push the piston all the way down and then topoff the reservoir.
    4. Keeping the actuator and the hose above the shock lightly snug (not tight) the hose down in its proper position. You now have an actuator that is overfull.
    5. Evenly tighten the 3 screws that hold the reservoir to the actuator about 1/2 way. Carefully loosen the banjo bolt just a little and bleed a little fluid and any air out and again snug banjo bolt down. Now tighten the 3 screws that hold the reservoir to the actuator all the way and again bleed a little fluid and any air out and then with the hose in the proper position tighten the banjo bolt completely.
    6. Check operation and the electric motor should start to 'labor' at '0' or '1'. If not repeat! Note: If you have the system completely full it is sometimes tough to tell when the motor 'labors' because it starts out that way. If the motor sounds the same thru out its travel you should be good to go.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky View Post
    To refill the actuator.

    1) Place the bike on center stand.
    2) Start the bike and lower your presets to "0'.
    3) Remove the seat and side covers.
    4) Remove the rear fender.
    5) Remove the three bolts inside the right saddlebag.
    6) Remove the bolt on the outside upper right of the saddlebag to the frame.
    7) Now tilt out the bottom of the saddlebag and let it rest there-You do not have to disconnect anything further!
    8 ) Now remove the 2-12mm & 1-10mm bolts from the Actuator securing it to the frame.
    9) Now with a pair of needle nosed pliers-squeeze the push in cable holder for the Grey connector.
    10) Now you can remove the other connector from the Actuator.
    11) Now using brake clean,Spray the area at the banjo bolt/hose so it is clean-You'll be making marks on it there!.
    12) Now with a sharpie-make a dot on the top of the banjo "Fitting".So you'll know which end is up later on!.
    13) Now make a small line right under the dot you just made to the actuator body.What you are doing here is marking the Orientation of the banjo fitting to the actuator body!. Making Sure you put it back in the same place-this is Important so the hose doesn't get kinked when the actuator is bolted back on the frame later!!.
    14) Now you can remove the 10mm banjo bolt from the hose.
    15) Either with a helper or duct/masking tape-try and keep that end of the hose as high as you can so fluid doesn't drain out of it while you continue to the next step.(I run the tape up from the hose to the truck if working by myself!)This keeps the hose out of my way for the time being.
    16) Now with a thin screwdriver,Insert it into the banjo bolt hole in the actuator,and push the seal piston down with a little pressure until it bottoms out.If you feel or hear it move?.Then try to push it down again until it stays down!.You're trying to fill as much of the actuator reservoir as possible here!.
    17) Now you are ready to refill the actuator.it only takes a couple ounces to top it off.I use SS8-10wt oil.
    18 ) Once you have it topped off,Now replace the hose according to the marks you made earlier.
    19) Now before you bolt it back on-"Test it first"
    20) Plug both connectors back in the actuator,an start the bike.
    21) Listen for a "Sound" pitch change as you add presets.Once you hear it change sound-Let the button go,and look at the dash-If it's at "0" then you are done,If it at 1 or more.repeat the last steps to add a tad more fluid.

    Your goal is to hear a sound change at 0-1.

    Hope this helps.
    Rocky: I sent you a pm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WingMan71 View Post
    Greg, help me out here. That confuses me a bit.

    I thought that the actuator system that sets the preload on the spring is a completely separate hydraulic system from the actual shock absorber (damper unit) itself. I don't believe that any of the oil that is in the actuator system ever sees the inside of the actual shock absorber. It only mechanically sets the spring preload. The shock looks like a sealed damper unit just like a standard shock on a car, and it's damping rate never changes other than by wearing out of the internal components or a leak.

    Am I all wet here, or am I right about these two system being completely separate from each other in regards to the hydraulic fluid in each?

    ***
    Sorry ... you are correct. The shock is seporate.

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    I don't think the weight of the oil makes any difference as long as it will mix with the existing oil and not attack the rubber parts in the system.

    Ralph Wenzl

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    I don't think you have to have the engine running to test. Matter of fact, it would be easier to hear the pitch change of the motor with the engine not running. Just put the key to the "accessories" slot.

    Dan Moore
    St Charles, MO

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    Quote Originally Posted by insdan View Post
    I don't think you have to have the engine running to test. Matter of fact, it would be easier to hear the pitch change of the motor with the engine not running. Just put the key to the "accessories" slot.

    Dan Moore
    St Charles, MO
    Correct. I just did this a couple days ago. "Accessories" position will allow you to work the unit without engine running making it much easier to hear what's going on. I used jack oil to top off the unit (Stu O mentioned using this in a recent Wing World). Even though mine did not load until "8", it took a very small amount to complete the fill - just an ounce or two. Now loads at "1".
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    So two minor questions: When you push the piston down....does the piston stay down when you remove the screwdriver?

    What is a decent time frame to do this...for first time around?

    Thanks.
    Tim
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    Quote Originally Posted by tcsenloe View Post
    So two minor questions: When you push the piston down....does the piston stay down when you remove the screwdriver?

    What is a decent time frame to do this...for first time around?

    Thanks.
    The piston should stay down when pushed to the bottom of the bore. I'd say a couple three hours if you've never done it before and just want to do the refill. Getting to it takes more time then the actual process of topping it off. Just remember to check it before you put it completely back together.
    Larry Price
    Edgewood, WA

    I run Hybrid Tires....
    Front: Bridgestone Exedra G709 130/70R-18
    Rear: Michelin Primacy Alpin PA3 ZP 195/55R-16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Price View Post
    The piston should stay down when pushed to the bottom of the bore. I'd say a couple three hours if you've never done it before and just want to do the refill. Getting to it takes more time then the actual process of topping it off. Just remember to check it before you put it completely back together.

    I was in a hurry yesterday and did one that started at 13 in 35 minutes from getting bike on center stand to putting the tools away.It was for a friend,So he got the stay out of my way and I'll go faster treatment.

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